The Spire of Lloyd

The Spire of Lloyd

The Spire of Lloyd was built in 1791 by the First Earl of Bective. It is 30m (100ft) tall and provides spectacular views of the surrounding countryside. It is a folly lighthouse that is thought to have been built to provide work for local people during the Great Famine. The Spire of Lloyd is located in The People's Park on the Oldcastle Road out of Kells and is open to the public on public and bank holidays. Visit www.visitingkells.ie for opening times.

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

St. Colmcille's House

St. Colmcille's House

St. Colmcille's House is thought to have been built in the 11th Century as a place to house the relics of St. Colmcille, including The Book of Kells. It could also have been a scriptorium where The Book of Kells was finished following the destruction of Iona Monastery in Scotland. The house is on Church Lane, near St. Columba's Church, and guided tours can be arranged (details on entrance gate). 

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

The South Cross

The South Cross

The South Cross is the oldest of the High Crosses in Kells. It can be found in the grounds of St. Columba’s Church, near the Round Tower. The east face of the cross depicts Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, Cain slaying Abel, the three children being thrown into the furnace, Daniel in the lions’ den and the raven bringing bread to St. Paul and St. Anthony. The cross may have been used to keep the stories of the Bible accessible to the public while The Book Of Kells was carefully protected inside the monastery. 

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

The Broken Cross

The Broken Cross

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

The Unfinished Cross

The Unfinished Cross

The Unfinished Cross, or The East Cross, gives us an insight into how High Crosses were constructed. The Round Tower behind dates from 1076 and is unique in having five windows at the top pointing to the five ancient routes into Kells.

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

The Cross of Kells

The Cross of Kells

The Cross of Kells is one of the five original high crosses. It is thought to have been made in the 9th Century. The intricate design and masonry was used to depict scenes from the Bible in a way that was publicly accessible as manuscripts at the time, such as The Book of Kells, were protected as precious items. The east face is featured in this photograph, which depicts Daniel in the lions den in the centre of the head. To the left is the sacrifice of Isaac, the the right is the temptation of St. Anthony. Below are Adam and Eve on the left with Cain slaying Abel on the right. The centre is thought to be Christ or perhaps David or Goliath. Below this, just above the celtic swirl design, is the tomb of Jesus.

The Cross of Kells is located outside the Old Courthouse on the Navan Road. 

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

The Headfort Mausoleum

The Headfort Mausoleum

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

St. Kieran's Well

St. Kieran's Well

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

Home Tree

Home Tree

Photograph. 2014 by Jass Foley. Available for purchase online HERE.

St. Columba's Church

St. Columba's Church

St. Columba's Church tower marks the original location of the monastery of Kells, dating back as far as 804 A.D.

Photograph, 2015, by Jass Foley.